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Introducing Josh Shozen as SVP of Enterprise Solution Sales for Appier Japan and South Korea

Author | Junde Yu, Chief Business Officer, Appier

I’m excited to welcome Satoshi (Josh) Shozen to our team as Senior Vice President of Enterprise Solution Sales for Japan and South Korea.

Based in Tokyo, Josh brings over 15 years’ experience in enterprise software sales management and digital marketing in Japan and the region where he has worked with global technology companies including Adobe, Proscape Technologies, and Microsoft.

Before joining Appier, Josh was the country manager for SundaySky Japan, the creator of SmartVideo platform, and helped develop the strategic partner ecosystem for selling into major FSI and Automotive clients.

In his new role, Josh will lead our teams in both countries to strengthen the business of Aixon, an AI-powered Data Intelligence Platform that Appier launched last July. More than 10 clients, including Japanese real estate portal LIFULL, have already successfully deployed Aixon and transformed their digital marketing campaigns.

While we continuously upgrade technology for Aixon’s functionality to help our customers’ business success, such as the recent integration with LINE Business Connect, we also see the strong potential of our business in both the marketing and data intelligence platforms.

With Josh on board, we are looking to accelerate our business in Japan and South Korea, especially the latter, a highly mobile-dominated market where 60-70 percent of e-commerce is made through mobile devices.  

Graduated from the University of Washington, Josh started his career at Microsoft in Seattle as a solution sales specialist. He was transferred to Tokyo in 2003 to manage Microsoft’s Global Accounts segment for Japan as a Regional Business Manager. Josh later moved on to lead the Japan and APAC business as VP for Proscape Technologies before joining Adobe Japan as Director of Digital Marketing Solution Div. Enterprise Sales in 2012.

As an avid surfer, Josh enjoys a variety of watersports and outdoor activities with his family and friends in his spare time, either in Japan or at his other home on the Big Island of Hawaii.


About the author:

Junde Yu is the Chief Business Officer of Appier, a leading Artificial Intelligence (AI) company. He leads the company’s Enterprise business, which includes Aixon, an AI-based data intelligence platform. Junde joined Appier from App Annie, where he was Managing Director of Asia Pacific. He started at App Annie as its first sales rep in the region and grew the sales and marketing team in the region to achieve very extensive revenues across the Asia Pacific region. It was also here that he acquired an appreciation for how enterprises could derive tremendous value from data.

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